Archive

Posts Tagged ‘religious book sales’

What the CBA Bestsellers List Looks Like When You Edit Out Some Categories

This is from the list from the Christian Bookseller’s Association’s July bestsellers list, the last one posted online; it’s what you get when you eliminate:

  • all the iterations of Jesus Calling (highest individual rank #5)
  • all the iteration of The Standard Lesson Commentary
  • all the various adult coloring books (Update: turns out there were none in the top 40)
  • various children’s titles
  • two fiction titles
  • a package of tracts

Titles showing in the image above are unrelated.

Their ranking is placed after each entry in brackets.

  1. Goliath Must Fall – Louie Giglio (1)
  2. Without Rival – Lisa Bevere (2)
  3. Driven by Eternity – John Bevere (4)
  4. Jesus Always – Sarah Young (8)
  5. The Comeback – Louie Giglio (10)
  6. Boundaries – Henry Cloud (14)
  7. Uninvited – Lisa TerKeurst (15)
  8. The Circle Maker – Mark Batterson (17)
  9. Swipe Right – Levi Lusko (20)
  10. No More Faking Fine – Ester Fleece (23)
  11. Steve McQueen – Greg Laurie (24)
  12. The 5 Love Languages – Gary Chapman (25)
  13. When God Doesn’t Fix It – Laura Story (26)
  14. The Mystery – Lacey Sturm (27)
  15. Good or God – John Bevere (28)
  16. The Little Things – Andy Andrews (29)
  17. Simple Pursuit – Passion (31)
  18. Purpose Driven Life – Rick Warren (33)
  19. Magnolia Story – Chip and Joanne Gaines (34)
  20. How’s Your Soul – Judah Smith (36)

The Steve McQueen book is a bit of a curiosity which we mentioned here previously on the link list. Louis Giglio has three titles (two written by him, plus he wrote the intro to the Passion book) and two of the titles (13 and 14) are by Christian musicians. The dominance of John and Lisa Bevere in the list shows charismatic titles are still a driving force in Christian sales. Boundaries, Purpose Driven Life and 5 Love Languages show the enduring strength of those titles after many years. It’s also good to see new writer Levi Lusko doing so sell; I went to his church’s website and listened to a sermon two weeks ago.

Canadian Customers Not Prepared To Pay More

February 20, 2014 3 comments

Canadian list prices

It’s not going to work this time.

The market has changed. Competition is fierce. Customers are much more price-conscious. Most important, Canadian customers have become accustomed to seeing US/Canadian pricing which is approximately the same.

The frightening thing about the picture above is that the wholesaler has made no effort to cover up the U.S. price, which is what I think I might have done in the same circumstances. They don’t see the problem; they don’t see an issue; they don’t have to deal face-to-face with customers.

Canadian distributors are caught in a situation devised by U.S. literary agents — i.e. lawyers in disguise — who decided a long time ago consider Canada part of the U.S. market insofar as it applies to royalties. We’re just another territory like Puerto Rico or American Samoa. So every book sold here that’s of U.S. origin has a price that rises and falls with the value of the Canadian dollar. (Or more accurately, the  difference in value; many of the so-called ‘drops’ in the CDN buck are actually bolstered investor confidence in the U.S. economy.)

Customers are caught in the middle of a war they don’t know exists.

So why don’t distributors here speak up on behalf of retailers and consumers? If there is an impact to the present price increases here — and I believe there will be a measurable one this time around — they may be forced to.

Yes, Canada has a more robust economy. Yes, there is a sense in which retailers here need higher MSRPs in order to cover higher rents and higher labour costs. But all the customer sees, when they look at the example pictured above is, “Why do I have to pay $3.50 more?” That’s 22% (21.8) and as of noon today, buying a US dollar costs $1.135 (posted rate of 1.11 plus 2.5% bank charge).

The consumer thinks, “Dollar is 11% higher; book is 22% higher.”

The Canadian dollar has actually been rising on five of the last six trading days. (It’s down today, though.) Did suppliers overreact by switching to a 20% conversion? How did they all (initially) pick that same number? (David C. Cook backed off its original conversion, $14.99 books that had jumped to $17.99 are now at $17.50.)

We just don’t need this. Not now. The timing is not good.

We need a Canadian market price.

We need Canadian distributors to speak up for us and demand a fixed Canadian market price.

Religious Books Profitable for Books-a-Million

Found this little information nugget buried in a local news story about a Books-a-Million opening in a former Borders location in Maine:

Books-A-Million stores also have a section called Faithpoint, which features bibles, Christian fiction and books on Christian living, according to a company news release. A PubTrack report cited by Publisher’s Weekly in August said 17 percent of the company’s sales came from religious books, compared to 7 percent at Borders and 10 percent at Barnes & Noble.

While Faithpoint focuses on Christian books, a search of the company’s online store also turned up results for books about other faiths. [Company spokesperson Jane] Hoerner downplayed the company’s reputation as a religious retailer, and said Books-A-Million’s selection isn’t that different from other major booksellers.

“We’re a bookstore,” she said. “All bookstores sell a wide variety of titles. Christian fiction is one of them, and it’s a growing category. All bookstores sell bibles.”