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Posts Tagged ‘Religious book distribution’

IVP UK Titles Now Available in North America

As reported last month at CBA Online, InterVarsity Press in the U.S. and their UK affiliate are back swapping titles. I say back because when I worked for IVP in Toronto years ago, we would regularly receive shipments from England. Until the article published, I was unaware that they had ever stopped doing this. (Some titles listed in the article below may not be included in Canada if another publisher holds Canadian rights.) Click the link in the title below to read at source.

IVP brings UK titles to North America

InterVarsity Press USA (IVP-USA) expanded their partnership with InterVarsity Press UK (IVP-UK) and the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (SPCK) to bring titles from the United Kingdom to the United States and Canada.

In 2015, SPCK made IVP-USA books available to bookstores in the United Kingdom and mainland Europe through Macmillan Distribution Limited (MDL). Now IVP-USA will distribute SPCK and IVP-UK titles throughout North America.

Titles that will now be available to North American readers include:

  • Creation, Power & Truth by N.T. Wright
  • A Celtic Liturgy by Pat Robson
  • A trilogy of classics in spirituality and spiritual formation, which includes The Living Flame of Love by John of the Cross, Introduction to the Devout Life by Francis de Sales, and Revelations of Divine Love by Julian of Norwich
  • Places of Pilgrimage by Ian Scott Massie
  • Come, Lord Jesus by Stephen Motyer
  • Aidan, Bede, Cuthbert: Three Inspirational Saints by David Adam
  • But is it True: Honest Responses to 10 Popular Objections to the Christian Faith by Michael Ots

 

Ingram Suspends Full Trade Discount to Small Stores

Ingram announcement

March 31st represented the annual culling of the herd at Ingram, better known in the Christian market as Spring Arbor, as stores failing to purchase $5,000 in 2015 had their trade discount reduced to 30% on books. If you’re looking for a notice you missed, it may be because the announcement appeared as a “service alert” posted on the right hand side of iPage that you had to click to read in full:

ingramDear Valued Ingram Customer,

As with any business, Ingram must closely monitor our expenses and make adjustments when needed so we can continue to provide the speed, accuracy, and support that you’ve come to expect. Sometimes, as our costs decrease, we have been able to pass that savings on to our customers.

However, to cover increased freight and operating costs, we’ve found it necessary to explore and evaluate our discount structure. On March 31, 2016, all accounts that fell below $5,000 in net sales for 2015 will have a new discount structure of 30% on all regular discount items. Please note, this discount applies only to regular discount titles, regardless of quantities purchased or order method. All other items such as video, short, audio, etc., will continue to be discounted as they have been. Also, Ingram does review each customer’s account sales annually and offers volume discounts based on net annual purchases.

We truly value your continued business and appreciate your understanding in this matter. Please contact your Ingram sales representative or call Customer Care at 800-937-8200 if you have questions about this new discount structure.

Sincerely,

Ingram Content Group

So once again, it’s survival of the fittest. They didn’t even wait until April 1st, the policy is now in effect. Once again, I have some opinions on this, some of which I shared last year at this time.

  1. Small stores often get large orders. The bookstore owner or manager in a small market who works to get a 100 copy order gets no reward for their efforts. All other distributors base the discount on the size of the order, an approach Ingram has constantly resisted. I have orders currently holding from a couple of publishers waiting for me to add a few more titles. I have no problem working with that constraint. Send the Light’s minimum is 20 books. I understand why they instituted that and it’s not that hard for me reach their quota. As I said the last time this happened, I probably use some of my university publisher accounts once every 2-3 years, but my legitimacy and entitlement to a trade discount is never challenged.
  2. Ingram is a victim of their own system. Yesterday I received a $3.99 booklet from them. I have no idea why they do this or how they can afford to. When I placed my first iPage order, I was told to “click DC Pairs and where it says ‘hold/release’ click ‘release.'” I did what I was told. If I could change this, no one has ever told me what ‘hold’ signifies or how it would help save costs at their end and save the planet. They say they are “constantly monitoring expenses.” Uh…no, I don’t think so. If they streamlined their operations at their end, such as merging backorders or running multi-order invoices, they would not have to penalize small stores like yours at your end. Relatively speaking, this is all about shipping costs. The actual picking costs are minimal by comparison and the cost of a small store using the website is infinitesimal.
  3. Ingram already ships to addresses buying less than $5,000. In this case I’m referring to the host of individual consumers whose orders to companies like Chapters are fulfilled through Ingram. I feel like when I do place a larger order, I’m indirectly subsidizing the inefficiencies of Ingram’s costs in filling orders for online competitors.
  4. This shouldn’t apply to Ingram Publisher Services accounts. When Ingram is the exclusive distributor of a particular imprint, they are making money twice over. For a small store, they are the only game in town, and even if you approached the publisher directly and were willing to pay any importation costs, that publisher is contractually bound to Ingram as its exclusive warehouse distributor. Personally, I find scaling back the discount with respect to those publishers somewhat reprehensible. 
  5. Canadian stores were forced to scale back. Christmas season purchasing from the U.S. was greatly curtailed when our dollar crashed. With Ingram, accounts are settled by credit card on the 15th of the month following, so there was the added variable of not knowing what Canadian prices to set because no one knew how low our currency was going to fall.
  6. Ingram has other options. They could change the minimum order on iPage from 10 to 15 items or set a dollar-value minimum. They could change the “low” discount threshold from $2.99 to $3.49 or $3.99. They could adjust discounts on hardcovers as Send the Light did. They could modify discounts on publishers where they feel they are being squeezed. They could scrap the “cascade” system and have stores meet a 10-unit minimum per warehouse. They could scrap the minimum order altogether and change it to a minimum shippable. (The last two involve some major system reprogramming changes, but this is about saving shipping costs, right? And the price of oil is going to turn around eventually and courier fuel surcharges will again go up.)

In my community, a large, general-market bookstore is closing today. We put the word out to our customers that we would happy to take their orders on a variety of different subjects; not knowing our access to full margin on those items might be restricted. (At least I can do Hachette, HarperCollins, Wiley, and Penguin/Random House.) It’s more possible now that a store in my position (or a store that finds itself being given some larger orders) would have no problem meeting that $417 per month average. 

If you don’t know what your purchasing from them was in 2015, a phone call may be in order.

Sadly, for stores now facing a shorter discount, their relationship with Ingram vis-a-vis dollar volume, has now become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

It should be about the order, not a store’s performance in 2015.  


Update: I want to make clear that while this is partly personal, I just think this particular strategy is bad policy. It’s bad for bookstores, bad for publishers, bad for authors and really bad for Ingram itself, since it simply makes everyone angry.

If my account is a drain on their bottom line, then they should put structures in place that force me to consolidate orders, or higher minimum orders.

In our Christian product sales sector of the larger market, people are often well-networked and vertically integrated. So if I’m talking to a new publisher or a new author and they have a choice between Ingram Publisher Services and Advocate Distribution Services, I think it’s obvious which one I’m going to recommend.

 

David C. Cook Canada Purchased by Senior Management Team

David C. Cook Distribution Canada of Paris, Ontario has been sold. The announcement came Tuesday (1st) afternoon in a press release from its former U.S. parent in Colorado Springs. Many of us had trouble opening the release so I’ve copied it here in full:

DAVID C COOK SELLS CANADIAN DISTRIBUTION OPERATIONS

Colorado Springs, CO (March 1, 2016) – David C Cook’s Chief Executive Officer, Cris Doornbos, announced the Canadian management buyout of its Canadian distribution division, located in Paris, Ontario, by Executive Director Greg Tombs and Financial Director Hardy Willms. The sale is effective February 29, 2016.

The Canadian distribution division has been resourcing Christian and general market resellers and the church for over 30 years and will continue to provide a national full service sales, marketing and fulfillment operation. David C Cook’s resources will continue to be represented along with the other partners in Christian publishing, music, media, cards and gifts the organization already serves.

Greg and Hardy have been competent leaders over the years. They have a real passion for the dissemination and distribution of Christian resources for the long haul. We are confident that this purchase by Greg and Hardy will result in a long term continuation of their effective service to the Canadian market,” Doornbos stated.

During this transition, we remain committed to each and every customer and client and will ensure the high level of customer service everyone has come to expect from David C Cook Canada. Every effort has been made to make this transition as seamless and successful as possible. A strategic plan looking forward to 2020 is already being executed Greg and Hardy.”

Tombs said, “Hardy and I are delighted to have the opportunity to continue to serve the CBA trade, general market and churches in Canada with the books, curriculum, music, cards, gifts and church supplies that Canada needs for ministry and discipleship. We are pleased that we will continue to have a great working relationship with David C Cook as we continue to distribute their curriculum, books, and Integrity music in Canada.”

This is independent of another story we reported on earlier the same day of the selling of Augsburg Fortress Canada to the same owners.

Augsburg Fortress Canada Sold to David C. Cook Canada

augsburgfortress-logoChristian bookstores in Canada now have one less organization in the supply chain. Augsburg Fortress Canada has been purchased by David C. Cook Canada, effective March 1st. The sale includes all of the existing inventory and distribution rights for everything AFC carried including:

  • Augsburg
  • Fortress Press
  • Westminster John Knox
  • Abingdon
  • Abbey Press Gifts
  • Anglican Book Centre
  • United Church of Canada Publishing
  • Penguin/Random House religious titles (CBA rights only)
  • Waterbrook/Multnomah (CBA rights only)

Norm Robertson will continue to call on mainline Protestant and liturgical accounts representing the former AFC product line and any existing Cook products those stores may find of interest. One other former AFC staff member is transferring to Cook.

This also adds a curriculum line and VBS brand to Cook Canada’s already huge stable of Christian Education resources. (The company recently picked up the former Standard Publishing’s Sunday School curriculum.) With Abingdon, it also gives Cook a virtual monopoly on church bulletins and ancillary products.

Not to be overlooked in the deal is the strong success many stores are enjoying with Abbey Press giftware, which will also now be stocked and shipped from Paris, ON to Canadian accounts and will only make the brand more accessible to stores here. 

Anglican and United Church denominational products include a mixture of trade titles and items sold to stores on a short-discount basis.

The sale came about after Augsburg Fortress in Minneapolis had been seeking to shut down the Canadian operation if it could not find a buyer. The AFC retail store in Kitchener, ON has closed and is not part of the transaction. 


This story is independent of another announcement the same day of the sale of David C. Cook Canada to two members of its Canadian management team.

 

IVP (UK) and SPCK Join Forces

The UK division of InterVarsity Press (IVP) has joined with longtime UK Christian imprint SPCK in a business restructuring announced Wednesday (7th) which goes into effect immediately.  An article in UK’s Christian Book Shop’s Blog (see link below) contains the announcement, along with a transcript of an interview with Sam Richardson, CEO of SPCK which clarifies details of the newly combined entity.

IVP is described as “the leading Evangelical publisher” in the UK, and North Americans might not realize that the company also acts as the distributor — through a division they call Partnership Distribution — for various lines, which in the past have included U.S. Evangelical publishers Crossway, NavPress, Zondervan Academic; and UK-based publishers such as Evangelical Press and CWR, publishers of the Every Day With Jesus materials; along with many more. On the other hand, SPCK is described as “the much-loved champions of theological diversity.”  To this, Sam Richards said, “…[I]t does on the face of it look an unlikely partnership. This is the source of its strength. These are two publishing imprints that can be happily distinct, without needing to step on each others toes or compete for authors.”

Although IVP remains distinct, the new structure places it under SPCK, and just as IVP in the U.S. and Canada is affiliated with the ministry of InterVarsity Christian Fellowship (IVCF) so also in the UK does IVP work closely with Universities and Colleges Christian Fellowship (UCCF), therefore this new arrangement places SPCK at least indirectly involved with that organization.

In the article, Phil Groom notes:

Whilst some in the trade were aware that IVP was experiencing some financial difficulties, this development — which has significant implications for the wider trade as well as for the two publishers and their staff — appears to have taken everyone completely by surprise.

To connect with the official announcement, and read the full interview, click this link: A Brave New World for Christian Bookselling: SPCK Publishing CEO Sam Richardson answers questions from the trade