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Posts Tagged ‘Christian books’

Student Editions Build on Familiar Titles

This week in our store we’re featuring books with “Student Edition” in the title. These are not all of them, just some that were grabbed to make a quick display.  Many of our authors create student editions of their books for middle school or high school kids to better understand the concept of their bestsellers.

I split the shelf for this to render better on Facebook; left to right:

  • Mark Batterson (he has 3 others, all done with his son Parker),
  • Haley DiMarco (actually all her books are student editions; I’m not sure how this ended up on the shelf!),
  • Kyle Idleman (4 titles available),
  • Joyce Meyer (Battlefield for Teens, book spine is facing out, I should have swapped it out with Haley for the picture we posted on our store Facebook; not surprising there’s also a kids edition of Battlefield),
  • Lee Strobel (a total of six titles available and those same six titles also have a kids edition),
  • Lysa TerKeurst, and
  • Scot McKnight.

Not showing are

  • Christine Caine,
  • Max Lucado (he’s done 14, not all are in print)
  • The Story Bible, and
  • 3 titles by Mark Hall of Casting Crowns.

Great summer reading idea for the teen guy or girl in your customer’s family of sphere of influence.

The advantage of student editions is that these are editions of books with which adult readers are already quite familiar. Out of all the Christian books published for young adults, I would guess these probably represent about 2%, 3% or perhaps 4% at most.

Did I miss any?

 

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Author’s Personal Story Confronts Loss, Grief and Depression

Prince Edward County, Ontario’s Andrea Calvert has just released Not Alone: How God Helped Me Battle Depression through Word Alive Press. She’s also the daughter-in-law of some close friends who shared some of her story with me. I’ve been following her on Twitter and also just became aware of her blog, Inspiring Life Chats, where she’s been writing for nearly a year.

The 118-page paperback is just the right size for those who find themselves in the aftermath of a traumatic loss that is causing stress and depression. Priced at only 11.99 CDN it’s also affordable to give away to someone in the middle of such a situation.

Publisher Info:

Angry and hurt, Andrea didn’t want to have anything to do with God. How could she when, one day shy of her eighteenth birthday, she had to watch her mother being wheeled into the operating room of Toronto General Hospital to receive a liver transplant? How could a God that “loved” His people allow them to suffer so badly? Why did she have to spend so much time in and out of hospitals, watching the strongest woman she knew endure test after test? Watching this happen, Andrea came to the conclusion that no god would do that.

Then, on April 27, 2011, it was time to say goodbye. After ten long months of waiting for a second organ donation, Andrea’s mother made the decision to let go-it was the hardest thing Andrea had ever dealt with up to that point. The loss of her mother led her into a downward spiral of depression, PTSD, and anxiety. Andrea lost years of her life and still battles to this day with keeping her depression under control.

Jesus reached down and opened Andrea’s eyes at the darkest point of her depression. Searching for a way to deal with her pain, she called out to Jesus, who answered her prayers and called her back into His loving arms. What He has done in her life is nothing short of amazing-Jesus gave her purpose again!

This is her story…

ISBN 9781486616107 | 11.99 US / 11.99 CDN | Anchor Distributors and Spring Arbor (US), Word Alive (Canada)

 

Christian Author Flaunts Use of Expletives

The new book The Very Worst Missionary by Jamie Wright had the potential to speak to issues such as ‘short-term mission trips as seen by a full time career missionary,’ along with other topics. Over the years I’ve read her takes on short-term missions and I think she has some very valid things to say.

Unfortunately for all, she’s somewhat sabotaged her prospects for this book with gratuitous use of profanity, vulgarity and expletives; and what’s worse, she’s proud of it. I’m not sure what this says about where she is currently at spiritually, or what it says about Convergent, a division (like Waterbrook) of Penguin Random House (PRH).

CBD does not carry the book, and it’s not one of the PRH titles available to CBA stores in Canada through Parasource, at least not at present.

She writes,

“I have no interest in pandering to a larger crowd for the sake of a bigger audience, even if it means I won’t get my message to as many people. This may shock you, but it’s not my purpose in life to tell the whole church and everyone in it my thoughts on God and faith and ministry and all that stuff. My goal here was to write a memoir, not a thesis, so my job was to write my story, my way, and that’s what I did. For any number of reasons, the language being only one, the book I released into the world isn’t gonna appeal or be palatable to a lot of people, and I’m 100% cool with that.”

“I don’t really care if some hyper conservative blowhards don’t hear those messages from me. If someone’s eyeballs are too righteously delicate too see “bad words” in print, or their earholes are too religiously tender for a little Audible profanity, then a book that uses the word “f**k” to talk about f**ked up missions obviously isn’t the right vehicle to get the message to them. Like, I’m just not their people and my book is not their book — and that’s cool…”

Then, in the same blog post she totally flaunts her choice by listing all of the instances of swearing and invites readers to censor the book with a black sharpie if giving it to someone more sensitive. I’m including this here only to show those reading this the sheer volume of these which occur, though, in the spirit of the topic at hand, I’ve made a crude (pun intended) attempt to redact the words themselves:

I don’t want to seem hypocritical about this, but years ago we did decide to carry the testimony of Nadia Bolz-Weber, Pastrix, which has the f-word in the very first sentence. I think the packaging of that book and the fact it would only appeal to those who knew her limited the possibility of accidentally being purchased by the wrong person, and we also added  — and continue to add — a small warning sticker of our own to the back cover.

I’m not sure why I’m willing to give Nadia a pass and not Jamie, but each bookstore has to decide what works for them. I did have a white-haired grandmother rather deliberately purchase Nadia’s book and come back later to order multiple copies of it, and her book which followed. 

The publisher writes:

The Very Worst Missionary is a disarming, ultimately inspiring spiritual memoir for well-intentioned contrarians everywhere. It will appeal to readers of Nadia Bolz-Weber, Jen Hatmaker, Ann Lamott, Jana Reiss, Mallory Ortberg, and Rachel Held Evans.” 

That’s a rather narrow list.

It’s too bad that, a time when Christian authors, publishers and bookstores are struggling, an author would choose to deliberate his or her audience.

Don’t use foul or abusive language. Let everything you say be good and helpful, so that your words will be an encouragement to those who hear them.
 – Ephesians 4:29 NLT

Nor is it fitting for you to use language which is obscene, profane, or vulgar.
– Ephesians 5:4a GNT

 

 

Ontario Author Probes the Forces Behind the Sexual Revolution

As you read this, Ann Gillies in the middle of a busy seven weeks of touring which takes her through B.C., Alberta and Ontario. She’s presently in Calgary as a chaplain coordinator for the Billy Graham Rapid Response Team where last week she spoke in chapel at the Billy Graham Canadian headquarters in Calgary.

Ann is an ordained minister with Anchor ministries and also an affiliate of Vision Ministries. Her first book was Deep Impact: Integrating Theology and Psychology in the Treatment of Complex Trauma.

Publisher Marketing:

In Closing the Floodgates, psychotherapist Dr. Ann Gillies has written a blockbuster of a book exposing the biased, unscientific, and corrupt methods used to promote the sexual revolution of the last sixty years. In her powerful and compelling analysis, she shows how the truth of scientific fact has been overturned in the interest of pleasure and personal feelings, and how a determined minority is using social engineering to reconstruct our social and moral worlds by redefining gender, sexuality and the family. She draws an alarming picture of the consequences: identity confusion among the youth; sexual abuse and victimization of children; soaring rates of suicide and sexually transmitted diseases; the embedding of false, unhealthy, and immoral teaching in the school curriculum; and the loss of freedom of speech and parental rights.

While a few readers may find the level of detailed academic content challenging at times, Dr. Gillies is able to make professional findings understandable and real for the average person. For all the necessary research and statistical reporting, this is a gut-level book. In a time of culture wars, when the truth about gender and sexuality is under attack, this book sets the record straight. It issues a rallying cry to parents and others concerned for the future of the family and western society to be informed and take action before it is too late.

-Dr. George R. Slater, author of Along Comes God and Bringing Dreams to Life.

The book is available from Anchor/Word Alive and was published by Word Alive Press. ISBN 9781486612208 $23.99 CDN.

• For stores with in Ingram login, more endorsements from across Canada are shown there.

Brian Stiller’s New Book, In His Own Words

by Brian Stiller

It all started in Jerusalem, the home place of Christian witness. It then moved out into Asia and Europe, and in time elsewhere, but Europe continued for centuries to be the center of gravity. But then, in the twentieth century, the witness of Jesus broke out in new ways. It spread down through Africa, and a renewed form of faith infused Latin America and took hold in Asia. That center of gravity that once hovered over Jerusalem shifted westward, then south, with it now being around Timbuktu.

Today in every corner of the world, to over two billion people, Jesus has gone global.

Each book has a story. This one began years ago as I traveled, working with colleagues internationally, speaking at churches and staff conferences in various parts of the world. But it particularly took hold of me when in 2011, after stepping down as a university and seminary president, I was invited to immerse my life in the Christian community as global ambassador for the World Evangelical Alliance.

Be it in my home country of Canada or in visiting abroad, I was asked to speak on what I was seeing globally. In study and research, reflection, conversation, and observation, I saw particular forces (or as I note, drivers) at work, growing and reshaping the church. I tested these with missiologists, seeking to fairly and accurately identify what is at work today in our global Christian community.

Many factors impinge on and free up the gospel witness. Much has been written, as is indicated in the bibliography. My interest was to get to the heart of the drivers creating such remarkable growth. As Patrick Johnstone has noted about this period, “Evangelical Christianity grew at a rate faster than any other world religion or global religious movement.”1 In 1960, Evangelicals numbered just under 90 million, and by 2010 that had reached close to 600 million. I wanted to find out who and what they were. I also wanted to see what, within my lifetime, has engaged and continues to engage the reshaping of the church to which I belonged.

My life has been lived in the convictions and practices of an Evangelical community. Raised in the home of a Pentecostal church leader, after university—and for more than fifty years—I served in various Evangelical ministries, all the while building friendships and partnerships with Roman Catholics, Orthodox, and mainline Protestants. However, I know best this Christian communion. In general, my writing concerns itself with the Evangelical world, although occasionally statistics will encompass the entire Christian community.

A number of labels are used to describe this Christian world of “Evangelicals.” I include Pentecostals, as their history and theology is family in the Evangelical community. In some cases, to give emphasis, I use terms such as Evangelical/Pentecostal, or Evangelicals and Pentecostals, as in some countries, Pentecostals make up more than half of Evangelicals.

The shifting force of faith, in a world most often described in materialistic and commercial terms, is a factor that no longer can be denied, be it by a country leader, academic, or social observer. Each year, as more and more people in the Global South embrace Christian faith, the center of density of Christian populations pushes further south, leaving the real (and emblematic) city of Timbuktu toward places never before imagined.

 

Canada’s Brian C. Stiller is former President of Youth for Christ Canada, former President of the Evangelical Fellowship of Canada former President of Tyndale University College and Seminary and is now Global Ambassador, The World Evangelical Alliance.


978-0-8308-4527-9 | 248 page paperback | IVP Web-page & Reviews | in Canada: Parasource Distribution

Author’s blog and source for this article: Dispatches From the Global Village

The Human Right by Rice Broocks Ties in to God’s Not Dead 3 Movie

A new book from Rice Broocks, author of Man, Myth, Messiah, God’s Not Dead and The Purple Book is releasing February 20th from W Publishing (an imprint of Thomas Nelson) and will be promoted at the end of the movie God’s Not Dead 3: A Light in Darkness which releases Easter weekend.

Publisher marketing:

A different kind of evangelism book.

Just as the author’s book, God’s Not Dead, laid out the logical reasoning for God’s existence, and Man Myth Messiah established the existence and identity of Jesus Christ, now Rice Broocks brings a definitive book on the logical necessity to make the proclamation of the Gospel our highest priority. In fact, it is actually the ultimate justice issue and therefore the most important of all human rights. Consciously or subconsciously, many now believe that demonstrating tolerance is more important than truthFundamentally, the right to know the truth is even greater than the freedom to believe. Because Jesus Christ is the Truth, then humanity shouldn’t be denied the right to hear about Him, make their own decision, and then have the freedom to tell others.

Canadian Stores: There is an ITPE schedule for this title.

While we’re sharing trailers, here’s a peek at the movie:

 

Book Trailer Makes Me Want to Read This

I would (and will) stock this title based on the creativity and clarity of the book trailer. Take 3 minutes to watch this. Well done, IVP!

Krish Kandiah, PhD is the founder and director of Home for Good, a UK charity finding homes for foster children and young refugees. An international speaker, he teaches regularly at Regent College and Portland Seminary and is the author of several books.

Kandish encourages believers to allow their questions about faith to draw them closer to God. He also includes personal stories of his own faith journey, making God Is Stranger relatable and accessible for any reader grappling with questions about God and the Bible.   – Publisher marketing

352 pages, paperback; 9780830845323

 

Church: Misfits Welcome!

Brant Hansen’s second major book release is important enough I’m eventually going to devote another column to it here, but if you’re a retailer who hasn’t ordered it, I’d encourage you to have this one ready-to-ship to your store for the November 28th release. The full title is Blessed Are the Misfits: Great News for Believers who are Introverts, Spiritual Strugglers, or Just Feel Like They’re Missing Something (Thomas Nelson paperback, 9780718096311).

The target market for this is people

  • who are introverts
  • who deal with social anxiety; mental health issues
  • who are diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome (or something similar)
  • who feel they are just different; they don’t see the world like everyone else does

and the people who love them because they’re a family member, close friend, co-worker, fellow-student, etc. It will require you to do some promotion to help connect the book to its target audience.

I’m about 65% through the book and will post a full review here and at Thinking Out Loud when it’s closer to the release date.

Here are some resources to help you promote the book on Facebook and Instagram. These are sized 500px x 500px; ready to post for FB and ideal for Twitter.

 

Time of Year Books

There are points on the calendar where the time is right to give someone a particular book. With the first month of school now history, many kids in Junior High and Middle School face various challenges and some are no doubt frustrated.

The book pictured on the left is new from Revell. But the market is limited to guys which represent 50% of all possible readers, but only about 25% of the kids who really read at that age. (Though in the case, need to know may spark greater interest.) It’s been packaged and branded similar to the author’s Manual to Manhood. If boys do struggle with reading, this book promises 100 topics in “bite size” portions.

The book on the right covers both male and female students, but was published by Concordia in 2010 in a genre where advice can become easily outdated after more than 5 years. However it’s shorter (128 pages and also lower priced) which should appeal to kids who are mostly non-readers. (I especially like its cover design, though many schools now use whiteboards.)

But both are timely and will resonate with students having a tough school year.

Church Staff Decide Library Not Worth Keeping

While touring a church on a recent vacation day, I was taken to this church library where I simply had to take a picture. I love books and am a product of the power of Christian resources.

In Evangelical parlance, the phrase “the colour of the carpet” is used as a euphemism for other superficial issues which can serve as a distraction to true worship and fellowship. It functions in the place of a myriad of other topics which can be divisive in the life of a Christian congregation.

I’ve always sworn I would never be a “colour of the carpet” type of person. Some things are worth making a fuss over, and others should be consigned to the periphery of church concerns.

And then it happened.

At some point over the course of the summer they removed the church library where I worship and gave the contents to a local thrift store.

And I find myself seething.

So in order to justify myself, I have to be convinced that this is more than superficial; this is not about the colour of the carpeting. Here’s why I am so strongly persuaded.

This was someone’s ministry in the church. This was a ministry that someone had poured their heart into for the better part of a decade, receiving an annual budgetary commitment, but little else in the way of enthusiasm. The person was away for six weeks visiting family in another part of the country. They did receive an email warning of what was to come, but little could be done at a distance of thousands of miles. This person deserved some opportunity for closure even if it was one last opportunity to view the boxed-up collection. I list this factor first because as a family, we experienced grieving the loss of a ministry, more than once, at the hands of this same church, and so we identify strongly with this particular aspect of the closure.

The library showed the value the capital-C Church has placed on writings throughout history. Though many weeks less than a dozen resources went out, its presence in the church was iconic in the truest sense of that word. It contained resources for parents, books on basic doctrine and Christian theology, chronicles of the history of the denomination. There were Bibles, videos, CDs, and a host of teaching materials instructive for children.

Donations kept the collection fresh. The people, myself included, who donated resources for this were invested in this particular type of ministry. Some books had been given just weeks before the whole thing was eradicated.

Stewardship was squandered. Because of my vocational role in the community at the local bookstore, I know that several hundred dollars worth of books had been purchased only this year. (But only a few hundred dollars. I have no significant conflict of interest here. My reaction is that of a bibliophile.)

The resources belonged to the congregation. People should have been told about the closure weeks ahead, and had the opportunity to take books of interest and make them part of their home library. They belonged to the people of the church, not the church staff.

They could have helped another church that wanted to have this ministry in their church building. This is a denomination that keeps talking about ‘church planting’ and ‘daughter churches’ and being a ‘network of churches,’ but I doubt any were offered the contents of this already-carefully curated collection. Some would be saddened to know what they missed out on.

They could have sent the resources overseas. Again, as a missionary-minded denomination the idea that the collection wasn’t considered to send to pastors and workers who were unable to take their libraries with them to Third World countries is equally perplexing. On a personal level, as an area volunteer for Christian Salvage Mission, I know the organization would have embraced this acquisition with open arms and heartfelt gratitude on behalf of North American pastors and English-speaking indigenous workers in Africa and Asia. Instead, I wasn’t given the slightest inkling that this was in the works.

They kept two racks of fiction. This was the most disturbing thing of all; what was kept. These shelves are now located in the church’s new café and someone noted that some were books with exceptionally loud colors on the spines. If you were going to keep fiction, these were some of the worst choices. In other words, these books are props. They are being used solely for decorative purposes, to create atmosphere.

They may be deluded that electronic media has replaced books. This church recently signed a contract with Right Now Media, giving church people free access to a large grouping of video content. This is fraught with issues. Video teaching is not the same as learning off the printed page, nor is long-term absorption of the material as great. Older people in the church won’t bother to sign up for Right Now or figure out how it works. The mix of authors and teachers with online content is totally different than those who work solely in print. The library would have complemented the other service. Now they’ll never know if that would have happened.

The space will not see a higher purpose. Looking at that empty room, I wanted to be optimistic; I wanted to say, “Prove to me that what you’re about to do in this space is better than what you had.” It absolutely won’t happen.

The church bylaws are flawed. Major expenditures require approval in a congregational meeting, but the jettison of a major church asset requires no such approval. Given the number of now out-of-print titles that were displayed alongside more recent titles, I’d put the value of what was effectively trashed at at least $20,000 — books aren’t cheap — and that’s an informed opinion of someone working in the publishing industry. So you need to call a vote to acquire larger things, but you’re free to simply give away previously-acquired larger things? No. Not a good idea. For churches or families. Churches operate on the basis of consensus.

The library was doomed for at least a year. I kept forwarding PowerPoint slides along the lines of “Be sure to visit the church library…” to be used in the on-screen announcement crawl before the service, but never saw them used. Now I know why…

…Honestly, I’m not sure where I’m going to church this Sunday. I have real issues with this. I’ve become what the church staff may say is a “colour of the carpet” curmudgeon.

I don’t care. It was plain wrong. The stakeholders weren’t consulted. A horrible decision.

Now there’s no turning back.


“The acquisition of Christian books is necessary for those who can use them. The mere sight of these books renders us less inclined to sin and incites us to believe more firmly in righteousness.”

– Epiphanius (4th Century)

IVP UK Titles Now Available in North America

As reported last month at CBA Online, InterVarsity Press in the U.S. and their UK affiliate are back swapping titles. I say back because when I worked for IVP in Toronto years ago, we would regularly receive shipments from England. Until the article published, I was unaware that they had ever stopped doing this. (Some titles listed in the article below may not be included in Canada if another publisher holds Canadian rights.) Click the link in the title below to read at source.

IVP brings UK titles to North America

InterVarsity Press USA (IVP-USA) expanded their partnership with InterVarsity Press UK (IVP-UK) and the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (SPCK) to bring titles from the United Kingdom to the United States and Canada.

In 2015, SPCK made IVP-USA books available to bookstores in the United Kingdom and mainland Europe through Macmillan Distribution Limited (MDL). Now IVP-USA will distribute SPCK and IVP-UK titles throughout North America.

Titles that will now be available to North American readers include:

  • Creation, Power & Truth by N.T. Wright
  • A Celtic Liturgy by Pat Robson
  • A trilogy of classics in spirituality and spiritual formation, which includes The Living Flame of Love by John of the Cross, Introduction to the Devout Life by Francis de Sales, and Revelations of Divine Love by Julian of Norwich
  • Places of Pilgrimage by Ian Scott Massie
  • Come, Lord Jesus by Stephen Motyer
  • Aidan, Bede, Cuthbert: Three Inspirational Saints by David Adam
  • But is it True: Honest Responses to 10 Popular Objections to the Christian Faith by Michael Ots

 

Toronto Area Author’s Story Is Known Worldwide

Known simply as “The Girl in the Picture” which is also the title of a previous book published by Penguin, Kim Phuc’s story gets another telling when Fire Road: The Napalm Girl’s Journey through the Horrors of War to Faith, Forgiveness, and Peace releases October 3rd from Tyndale House.

Get out! Run! We must leave this place! They are going to destroy this whole place! Go, children, run first! Go now!

These were the final shouts nine year-old Kim Phuc heard before her world dissolved into flames—before napalm bombs fell from the sky, burning away her clothing and searing deep into her skin. It’s a moment forever captured, an iconic image that has come to define the horror and violence of the Vietnam War. Kim was left for dead in a morgue; no one expected her to survive the attack. Napalm meant fire, and fire meant death.

Against all odds, Kim lived—but her journey toward healing was only beginning. When the napalm bombs dropped, everything Kim knew and relied on exploded along with them: her home, her country’s freedom, her childhood innocence and and happiness. The coming years would be marked by excruciating treatments for her burns and unrelenting physical pain throughout her body, which were constant reminders of that terrible day. Kim survived the pain of her body ablaze, but how could she possibly survive the pain of her devastated soul?

Fire Road is the true story of how she found the answer in a God who suffered Himself; a Savior who truly understood and cared about the depths of her pain. Fire Road is a story of horror and hope, a harrowing tale of a life changed in an instant—and the power and resilience that can only be found in the power of God’s mercy and love.

~from the release sheet page at Tyndale.com

Canadian stores should pre-order the biography from Foundation Distributing