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Karen Kingsbury Receives Honorary Doctorate from Liberty U

On Friday, May 12th as part of the Baccalaureate Ceremony, an honorary Doctor of Letters degree was conferred on Christian fiction author Karen Kingsbury by Liberty University in Virginia, the school founded by Jerry Falwell. (See this link for a 45-second video) This degree, according to Wikipedia, “in some countries, may be considered to be beyond the Ph.D. and equal to the Doctor of Science.”

Karen is an Adjunct Professor at the school, and four of her five sons are Liberty alumni. For the full introduction by David Nasser and acceptance by Karen to the school and graduating class, go to 31:31 in the video below and watch to 37:20.

Liberty News reported that at the same ceremony:

Five individuals received honorary doctorates during the service. Wallace and Eleanor Turnbull were presented with honorary Doctor of Divinity degrees for their missional work in Haiti and their many years of work with Haitian Liberty students through the Turnbull Foundation. New York Times best-selling author Karen Kingsbury received an honorary Doctor of Letters degree not only for her prolific works, which have been adapted for television and film, but for how she has impacted the Liberty student body as a parent of Liberty students and as an adjunct professor, teaching master classes on English, writing, publishing, and research. Campus pastor and Senior Vice President of Spiritual Development David Nasser received an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree and was recognized for his years of successful ministry and for leading Liberty’s student body in missions and service. [James] Robison was also presented an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree.

 

Worldwide Shortage of Book Titles Continues

September 13, 2016 1 comment

It sounds like a headline from Christian news satire site, The Babylon Bee, but the reality, as first reported here several weeks ago, has been noticed by Christianity Today at this article. There really are three books in current release with the same title, Unashamed.

unashamed

img-091316The confusion continues this month as the 2008 title about surviving an affair, Torn Asunder by Moody Press is being joined by a 2016 title from Eerdmans on helping children survive divorce.

Or is it? It was due out the first week in August. CBD doesn’t list the Eerdmans title, but Ingram does as well as the publisher website. But unlike the Unashamed confusion, this one is an academic book, publishing at $34.00 and probably won’t be stocked in too many retail outlets…

…Most retailers can handle books with similar or same titles. A bigger challenge comes when old books are released under new titles. Go to the popular online Christian book site and type “previously published as” (and its variants) and you’ll see just a few of these.

October’s Great Day, Every Day by Max Lucado is a reissue of Every Day Deserves a Second Chance. The original, despite the bright yellow cover, never reached its full potential in the market and turned up on overstock and remainder lists for several years. But I suppose every book deserves a second chance.

(Couldn’t resist.)


upper image: Christianity Today


Previously noted here in May: Two different CDs have similar titles, Where the Light Gets In (Jason Gray) and Where the Light Shines Through (Switchfoot).

Word Alive Won’t Replace Send the Light

When all is said and done, Word Alive/Anchor Distributing can never be to Canadian stores what Send the Light (STL) was. There is just too wide a gap that separates the companies and the major stumbling block for stores like ours is the inventory base.

Anchor/Whitaker House is an unabashedly Charismatic distributor/publisher.

I say that as a person who has no problem with that, objectively. I have never said much about myself in the nearly 9 years I’ve been doing this blog, but I am Arminian, not Calvinist, and I believe in the limitless power of the Holy Spirit. I’ve had experiences in speaking in tongues, and while I may not identify with that style of worship as much these days, I do not discount the validity of those experiences.

So this isn’t about doctrine.

The problem is, my customer base is wide: Anglicans, Catholics, Lutherans, Salvation Army, Brethren, Alliance, Reformed and Pentecostal. They want to read authors that are simply not represented in the Word Alive/Anchor database.

The other problem is the website. Let’s face it, STL spoiled us rotten. You could scan the new release section daily and see new products. You could use images from the site for your website, Facebook, Twitter and print advertising. You got a detailed annotation on the book (everything Ingram offers except page length.) You could check your own stock against their top selling lists by genre, including both their own sales and the CBA lists. You got extra discounts on contract-distributed (i.e. Advocate Distribution) products.

Instead, we’re left with a 1990s style website at WA that gets the job done, but barely. (I really hope they’ll take the time to study the STL website carefully before it’s taken down; no login is required except to see discounts; another great feature inasmuch as I can allow certain customers to browse it.)

For small stores like mine, this is complicated by the fact we no longer have trade discount status at Spring Arbor/Ingram, having purchased less than $5K from them last year. (I guess I shouldn’t have been so loyal to Cook and Foundation.)

We’re faced with having to tell a lot of customers that certain products just are not available to us any longer; or going back to establishing accounts with fringe U.S. publishers individually, and paying insane shipping costs to clear product across the border.

 

Review: Hearing God in Conversation

God has many means at his disposal to get our attention

Hearing God in ConversationOver a year ago I was privileged to read a manuscript edition and asked to do an endorsement for a book which was released today by Kregel. Hearing God in Conversation: How to Recognize His Voice Everywhere is the second book by Sam Williamson, following Is Sunday School Destroying Our Kids which we reviewed here, and which I stocked in my own store. 

A year is forever when you’re an author awaiting national release, so I was surprised today with the good news that the book is now available.  Here’s the book summary I wrote:

In Hearing God In Conversation: How to Walk with God, Samuel Williamson affirms the church’s long-held position that God’s primary means of speaking to us is through scripture; while at the same time, through a blend of Bible teaching, contemporary and classic Christian authors, and personal experience, shows us that God is in no way limited in terms of what he can use to prompt us, nudge us and lead us. Written in a casual, sometimes lighthearted style, Hearing God in Conversation propels us to a place of expectancy with respect to God’s voice; to look for God’s personal message to us in a variety of circumstances; and to be aware that God has a vast catalog of means he uses to guide his children.

Here’s the official publisher marketing for the book:

Christians are comfortable saying that Christianity is about a relationship with God. Yet many might also say that they sense little meaningful relationship with God in their own lives. After all, the foundation of good relationship is communication–but conversation with God often seems to go only one way. We may sing of walking and talking with God in the garden, His voice falling on our ears, but few have heard that beloved voice themselves.

Sam Williamson acknowledges the fundamental human longing to hear God’s voice and offers a hopeful supposition: God is always speaking–we’ve just never been taught how to recognize His voice. Williamson handles this potentially heady topic with his characteristic straightforwardness and leavening humor. This book deftly bridges the gap between solid biblical theology and practical application, addressing topics such as how to truly pray without ceasing, how to brainstorm with God, how to navigate our emotions, how to answer God’s questions, and how to hear God’s voice for others.

Hearing God in Conversation offers simple, step-by-step lessons on how to hear God. Williamson begins with Scripture meditation. He then expands the practice of listening for that voice everywhere–in the checkout line, on the job, in a movie theater, and even in silence. From there, he demonstrates how to hear God’s guidance when making any decision. By the end, readers’ eyes and ears will be opened to the limitless methods through which God speaks.

The 224-page book is distributed in Canada by David C. Cook at $19.99

 

Gatekeepers

Posting this tomorrow morning at Thinking Out Loud, and thought I would share it with you guys first…

binocularclock

When another volunteer decided to step down after many years, I offered to collect used books in our area for Christian Salvage Mission. I’m in the book business after all, so I believe in the power of Christian literature to transform lives. I haven’t been as successful at this as I could be however, because we now also have a Christian-operated thrift shop in town. Still, I try to inform customers of things we can take that the thrift store might not.

Sometimes the books that people drop off are excellent collections. I immediately recognize the authors or the publishers, even though the books may have sat on home library shelves since before I was born. Others are more recent; titles I would easily recommend.

But sometimes, in the middle of a great grouping of books there is the odd Mormon or Jehovah’s Witness or Seventh Day Adventist title. (I recognize that some readers will sense my concern about the first two, but not necessarily the third.)

How did those books end up on these peoples’ shelves? Was a friend persistent? Or did the individuals not realize what they were getting into?

At this point, as a matter of full disclosure, I should point out that I have a copy of The Book of Mormon somewhere in my library. My parents got it in a hotel room while as a family we were in Salt Lake City. I have read some small sections of it. If I die tonight, and someone is going through my collection, they might well ask the questions I am asking here.

Generally, though, I worry that the average, church-going, pew-warming, tithe-giving Christian may not have sufficient filters with which to process the origins of some books, and thereby see the books through a more finely-tuned discernment lens. Do people check to see what the publisher imprint is? Which group claims copyright? Where follow-up pages (with phone numbers or websites) lead?

I should say that I have an unfair advantage. I’ve spent so much time in the industry that when I see Pacific Press®, Deseret Book Company, or a reference to the Watchtower Society, I immediately know who I’m dealing with.

But it’s not just the publisher imprint. Many of the books out there use a similar style of artwork; even the titles themselves sometimes are just a plain giveaway, especially the outreach materials which are produced for giveaway…

…At first, I had no specific conclusion to this, other than to say that this is a reality and people need to be more careful what they allow to come into their homes.

But then it occurred to me that while I didn’t write this with any agenda, Christian bookshops offered the type of vetting process that is needed. One pastor once told me, “You and your wife are gatekeepers for the people in our town.” That’s an honor. It’s also humbling. It’s a huge responsibility.

As long as the Christian bookstore owner, or manager, or buyer knows what they are doing, they can insure that only titles of the highest orthodoxy are presented for sale. Even if they don’t, the distribution networks for such stores simply don’t carry materials from marginal groups. And the Christian publishers generally don’t produce such products in the first place.

To the contrary, when you buy a book online just because the title looked interesting, or it was “recommended for you,” or because “other customers also purchased,” or maybe just because it was in the religion section and you liked the price; you really, really don’t always know what you’re getting into, unless you are savvy about publishing.

When a Christian bookstore closes, we lose a certain level of discernment; we lose some badly needed filtering.

 

 

Christian Fiction Doing Just Fine, Thank You

CBD logoAnyone who has heard the rumors of the demise of Christian fiction — both in terms of losses to the eBook market, and overall declining sales — need look no further than the recent CBD Spring fiction catalogue to see that the genre is alive and well.

This 80-page, full color, glossy publication is a testimony to the health that at least this one company sees in Christian fiction, and one that would make an excellent showpiece for this category, were it not for the source. Let’s face it, long before the internet, CBD was sucking the life out of many local Christian bookstores, and continues to do so to this very day.

Even here at Christian Book Shop Talk, a trade blog, CBD advertising often appears in the space following an article. Their reach is pervasive and relentless.

Still, I find the fiction flyer encouraging. I suspect that at 80 packed pages, this is their largest advertising support of fiction authors and publishers; books and series. I also learned about some titles which my sales reps may have mentioned but I had missed: A new James Rubart (The Long Journey to Jake Palmer, Thomas Nelson) coming in July along with a new Richard Mawbry (Medical Judgement, Abingdon) along with new products by Lynette Eason and Judith Miller at Baker Book Group.

If you can get your hands on one, it makes a great inventory checklist as you head into the summer and fall seasons.

 

 

 

 

Independent Christian Authors Can’t Rely on Spring Arbor

Product needs to be placed with Anchor, Send the Light and International Distributors

In light of yesterday’s column about changes at Ingram Content Group, Spring Arbor is no longer a reliable choice for indie authors who want their product available to bookstores at a reasonable trade discount. If we’re talking several titles, or your self-publisher represents several artists, this make things a little easier, especially if physical books exist already and are not just sold print-on-demand.

Since not everybody gets picked up by Baker, Cook or Zondervan, Advocate Distribution is a strong alternative.

Since not every author gets picked up by Baker, Cook or Zondervan, Advocate Distribution is a strong alternative.

Most American stores have an account with Anchor Distributors or Send the Light Distribution. If you have several books to offer, Send the Light’s Advocate Distribution Solutions can provide fulfillment on a contract basis.

If a writer wants to ensure Canadian trade distribution from a domestic supplier the situation complicates. Historically, even if you have a great product, David C. Cook Canada, Foundation Distributing, and Augsburg-Fortress Canada are more interested in acquiring major U.S. publishing brands than they are in going to the bother of adding independent titles. If you’re a Canadian author, Foundation and Word Alive support homegrown authors but only to the extent your book is published with either Castle Quay or Word Alive Press. (Essence Publishing, in Belleville, Ontario has no distribution at all; stores often sources the Canadian-made product through Spring Arbor.)  In those cases, the words I was taught to repeat while working for the company that later became CMC Distribution (now part of Cook) continue to echo in my mind: “The market for Christian books is the U.S. market. Secure your U.S. deal and the book will fall into Canadian distributors’ hands automatically.”

But what if your U.S. distributor has no Canadian counterpart? Then it’s back to Send the Light and Anchor.

In the interest of efficiency, Canadian stores are reluctant to deal with too many suppliers. In the 21st Century, a new generation of bookstore owners have streamlined their bookkeeping and database processes. If the title is really hot and the indie publisher or author takes credit cards, they’ll place an order, but there is always the predisposition that independent product is somehow inferior to what the major publisher have on offer and sometimes, when it comes to packaging, marketing and editorial quality control, they are right. American store owners tend to be more entrepreneurial, but the rules of efficiency still apply.

The point for authors — many of whom follow articles at this site — is that if your custom publisher tells you that your product is automatically listed in the database at Spring Arbor, that’s no longer good enough. Personally, I would go the Advocate Distribution route*; your book (or CD) may even end up in a Spring or Summer flyer distributed to stores across the U.S., a possibility that Ingram Content Group does not offer.


*In a random survey of some of Advocate’s top titles, all were available at Amazon. I don’t mention the A-zon factor here because of long-running concerns as to whether or not this avenue of book distribution is sustainable over the longer term.

 

 

How Many of These Canadian Titles Does Your Store Carry?

A few weeks ago, I ran a list here of the Canadian authors I counted among my store’s inventory. But when I look at The Word Guild’s shortlist for this year’s awards, I feel like I’m not doing my part to support domestic publishing. I’m also amazed when I look at the top writers of Canadian Christian blogs how little crossover there is.  I don’t know what access issues I would encounter trying to carry any number of these in my store, or how many different wholesale sources it would involve. This is probably the biggest barrier to these seeing wider exposure in Christian retail in this country. Anyway, here are the 2015 Word Award nominees, which is part of a larger announcement which includes nominations for song lyrics and magazine articles. Click this link to read at The Word Guild.

SHORTLIST OF FINALISTS
THE 2015 WORD AWARDS

BOOK CATEGORIES

Book – Academic

David Koyzis of Hamilton, Ont. for We Answer to Another (Wipf and Stock)

James K. A. Smith of Grand Rapids, Mich. for Who’s Afraid of Relativism? (Baker Academic)

Leonard Hjalmarson of Thunder Bay, Ont. for No Home Like Place (The Urban Loft)

Book – Biblical Studies

Alan and Elizabeth Davey of Toronto for Climbing the Spiritual Mountain (Wipf and Stock)

John W. Martens of Delta, B.C. for The Gospel of Mark (Red Maple Press)

J. Richard Middleton of Rochester, N.Y. for A New Heaven and a New Earth (Baker Academic)

Book – Children

Aimee Reid of Hamilton, Ont. for Mama’s Day with Little Gray (Random House Children’s Books)

Donna Simard of St. Lazare, Man. for Shhh! It’s A Surprise: Michael and Dad at the Zoo. (Word Alive Press)

Book – Christian Living

Alan and Elizabeth Davey of Toronto for Climbing the Spiritual Mountain (Wipf and Stock)

Drew Dyck of Carol Stream, Ill. for Yawning at Tigers (Thomas Nelson)

Wendy VanderWal-Gritter of Mississauga, Ont. for Generous Spaciousness (Brazos Press)

Book – Culture

David Peck of Oakville, Ont. for Real Change Is Incremental (BPS Books)

Sandy Oshiro Rosen of Fort Langley, B.C. for Bare – The Misplaced Art of Grieving and Dancing  (Big Tree Publishing)

Book – Instructional

David Sherbino of Toronto for Living, Dying, Living Forever (Castle Quay Books)

Robert Shaw of Sunderland, Ont. for The Complete Leader (Castle Quay Books)

Book – Life Stories

Bobbi Junior of Edmonton, Alta. for The Reluctant Caregiver (Word Alive Press)

Deborah L. Willows of Huntsville, Ont. and Steph Beth Nickel of St. Thomas, Ont. for Living Beyond My Circumstances (Castle Quay Books)

Sandy Oshiro Rosen of Fort Langley, B.C. for Bare – The Misplaced Art of Grieving and Dancing (Big Tree Publishing)

Novel – Contemporary

Karen V. Robichaud of Dartmouth, N.S. for The Unforgiving Sea (Word Alive Press)

T.G. Cooper of Hamilton, Ont. for The Pastor Who Hated Church (T.G. Cooper)

Novel – Historical

Erin M. Hatton of Barrie, Ont. for Across the Deep (Word Alive Press)

Janice L. Dick of Guernsey, Sask. for Other Side of the River (Helping Hands Press)

Novel – Romance

Sandra Orchard of Fenwick, Ont. for Identity Withheld (Harlequin)

Valerie Comer of Creston, B.C. for Sweetened with Honey (GreenWords Media)

Novel – Speculative

Donna Fawcett of St. Marys, Ont. for Between Heaven and Earth (Newscroll Books)

Marcia Lee Laycock of Blackfalds, Alta. for The Ambassadors (Helping Hands Press)

Novel – Suspense

Janet Sketchley of Dartmouth, N.S. for Secrets and Lies (Janet Sketchley)

Kelsey Greye of Lloydminster, Alta. for All That Remains (Wesbrook Bay Books)

Sandra Orchard of Fenwick, Ont. for Blind Trust (Revell)

Novel – Young Adult

Fern Boldt of St. Catharines, Ont. for Blemished Heart (Word Alive Press)

Jack A. Taylor of Vancouver for The Cross Maker (Wesbrook Bay Books)

Karen V. Robichaud of Dartmouth, N.S. for The Unforgiving Sea (Word Alive Press)

Philip Yancey on Writing

Philip YanceyThis is part of a much longer article at WORLD Magazine online:

You have been in the Christian publishing industry and the evangelical church for going on 40 years. What changes have you seen in that time? There are huge changes going on in publishing, in general, and in Christian publishing. The biggest thing, noticeable to me, is how Christian bookstores and general bookstores are departing one-by-one. I hear these statistics that something like half of the number of independent bookstores are in existence now that were even 20 years ago. People are buying online. They’re buying at Walmart, at Target, and Costco. It used to be if you wanted a Christian book, you would go to a Christian bookstore, browse around, see what caught your eye, and take it home. Now that doesn’t happen so much.

It’s harder, for sure, for younger writers to make a living. I feel very blessed to have lived in the period of time I did because I could make a living doing things I’d want to do apart from that. I worked out my faith in words, in print, and was able to make a living while doing it.

Tell me about when you are in the writing mode. Do you write a couple of hours a day? Do you research? Do you write for weeks on end and then don’t write for months? What does that discipline look like for you? A lot of people have the idea that you just kind of roll down to your desk and sit there and look up and think, “Hmm, wonder what I’ll write today.” It’s not like that at all, at least the kind of books that I write. Usually, when I choose to write about a topic—take prayer, for example—I’ll have been mulling it over for years, and I’ll have some fat file folders full of clippings. I’ll have an accumulation of books, a shelf full of books, and I’ll have been reading and thinking about it. Okay, so now I’m going to write about prayer. In that case, I spent probably six to eight months before I wrote a word. I interviewed a lot of people. What is your prayer life like? Why is it unsatisfying? What are your biggest questions about prayer?

I spent several months in seminary libraries, reading about what other people have to say. And then [there is] a period of time where I do outlining, organizing my thoughts. I’ve got all this data. Now, how do I make a book out of it? I often end up with an outline. Usually my outlines are about half as long as the chapter, so they’re pretty extensive outlines. Then comes that terrifying time when there’s the blank computer screen or the blank piece of paper. I’ve got these thoughts, but I’ve got to come up with words and sentences and transitions. That’s the terrifying, painful time. I try to get away somewhere, out to a mountain cabin, in my case, and get that over with as fast as possible.

I began my life as an editor for a magazine called Campus Life, and so as soon as I get the words down, then I can slip into that much more comfortable role of editing, trying to make some sense out of the words that I’ve got down.

Vanishing GraceOnce you have a draft, how different is that draft from what ultimately gets published? In What’s So Amazing about Grace? I cut 150 pages out of it. I realized this was a tangent. … The book I just finished,Vanishing Grace, had an outline of, I think, 12 chapters. In the final draft, only one of those chapters survived. I realized I was kind of cobbling together things that didn’t belong together, and other questions came up in the process of writing, so I just kept redoing it, redoing it. I keep all that stuff that I cut in a little file called junk, J-U-N-K, and I’ve got a macro that’ll just take whole paragraphs out and stick it in that junk file. I keep thinking, one day I can use that stuff. Then later, when I look at that junk file, I realize why I called it junk to begin with.

When it comes to the end for you, what do you want people to say about Philip Yancey? …I once likened my writing career to a jungle explorer and he’s got the machete out and he’s cutting through these thick vines, and he has no idea where the other side is. Then finally he gets through and says, “Oh, there it is. There’s the ocean. I made it.” Then to his surprise, he turns around and looks, and there is a whole line of people following him on that path. That’s how I feel as a writer. I’m not thinking about those people following me. I’ve got the machete hacking through the vines trying to get through to the other side. How can I get there? Then, to my surprise, and delight, I turn around and hear from people who say, “Thank you. I was on the same path. Thank you for showing me the way.”

Read the full article, click here.

Peterborough Author Back With 12th Release

Judi PeersWe took this title on consignment from the author a few days ago, and half our copies are gone already. Released in Canada and the U.S. through Word Alive Press.

From the Peterborough Examiner:

Peterborough author Judi Peers has focused on two areas in her latest book.

The 57-year-old writer has taken on the church and the issue of women in Playing Second Fiddle: God’s Heart for Harmony Regarding Women and the Church.

The theme is essentially a discussion of God’s purpose for women in the church and calling for the elevation of women in such an environment. Peers shows how both men and women are called to play second fiddle and look to Christ to play the lead in accord with 21st century culture…

Peers has been an author for about 30 years, mainly writing children’s books, and this is her 12th. She began putting it together a couple of years ago and took about six months to complete it, with revisions and re-write still to come. She said some of it has come from personal experience…

…Wildlife artist and author Kelly Dodge created the front cover image with illustrations by Mary Coles.

“The basic message is that all of us, men and women, be engaged to use our gifts and callings equally,’’ she said. “It calls for inclusiveness.’’

Peers is not only an author, but a speaker, publisher and Bible study leader. She is writing Christian material currently, and three of her works are included in the award-winning Canadian anthology A Second Cup of Hot Apple Cider, in the pages of Chicken Soup for the Soul and its Christmas in Canada. She also published Guardian of the Lamp, a Bible study on the understanding of the Old Testament.

Read the full article at The Peterborough Examiner.

Available in the U.S. as well, through Ingram: 9781486607273

 

CanCon3: China, My Challenge

In a U.S. dominated industry, I often hear both customers and insiders asking what my store is doing to promote Canadian authors. So today, we conclude our series promoting three Canadian authors.  Today we feature Doris Goheen who is representative of a number of authors whose work is published by Essence Publishing in Belleville, Ontario, or their subsidiary imprint, Guardian Books.

Doris lives in our town and has been a customer, but again we find ourselves wrestling with needing to determine what promotional vehicles exist to drive customers into the store seeking the book. Sometimes a book of this type is of interest to select customers in a broader market, and so online sales from people in a variety of locations will account for a greater response than anything that can be accomplished in the author’s hometown.

China My Challenge - Doris GoheenPublisher Marketing: Finding myself thousands of miles from home in China, unable to write, read, understand or speak the language, I realized I was suddenly ostensibly illiterate.

With none of the resources available to me back in Ontario, I was forced to draw on the years I spent attending a one-room Ontario school where resources were few. The Christmas concerts we did every year meant that the words of the carols and plays were still in my memory, as were the words and tunes of songs popular in 1950s-era Canada, which are so loved by China’s young people today.

Doris Goheen grew up in the village of Newcastle, Ontario and on a farm just north of Port Hope. She currently lives in Cobourg on the north shore of Lake Ontario. After retiring from teaching many years in Ontario, she spent a year teaching English in a college of tourism in northeastern China. When not writing, she spends her time working on her family farm, researching genealogy, traveling and studying the Bible.

This title is also available as an e-book from the following retailers: Apple’s iBooks Store (available only on the Apple iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch), The Kindle Store and the KOBO Bookstore.

ISBN: 9781460001592  paperback $15.00 130 pages

CanCon 2: Voices in the Wilderness

In a U.S. dominated industry, I often hear both customers and insiders asking what my store is doing to promote Canadian authors. So today, we continue our series promoting three Canadian authors.  Today we feature Judith Utman from Brockville. Her book Voices in the Wilderness is available to Canadian stores from Ingram at a short discount or from the publisher, Sands Press.

Voices in the WildernessPublisher Marketing: Jack Davidson has all the experience he needs for any survival situation — or so he thinks. As he prepares to instruct his next basic navigation course on Seeley’s Mountain, he is unaware of an evil headed his way that will change everything. His students are expecting a pleasant getaway from their high-pressure lives in the city, but their weekend soon turns to terror and puts their rudimentary survival skills to the test. As suspicions build and events begin to spiral out of control, they soon turn to and against each other and learn more than they ever expected.

Voices in the Wilderness is more than just a novel; it is a powerful work that has the ability to thrill and entertain as well as to teach readers about the unfailing strength of the Lord. One reviewer claimed that “The Holy Spirit ministered to be in and through this book.” I believe that many who read Voices in the Wilderness will share in these sentiments, and will enjoy this unique approach to the adventure genre that glorifies God and all that He does.

464 pages Paperback  9781449767556 $30